Princeton Seminary | Hanna Reichel
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Hanna Reichel

Associate Professor of Reformed Theology

Hanna Reichel
Theology
Religion & Society
106 Hodge Hall

Phone: 609.497.7996
[email protected]
Presbyterian

Profile
Hanna Reichel is associate professor of reformed theology at Princeton Theological Seminary. Reichel earned their Dr. theol. (~ PhD) in systematic theology from Heidelberg University, Germany, after an MDiv in theology and a B.Sc. in economics. Prior to coming to Princeton in 2018, they have taught at Heidelberg University and Halle-Wittenberg University.

Reichel has authored two monographs and more than two dozen peer reviewed articles or chapters, as well as co-edited six volumes or themed journal issues. Their first book Theologie als Bekenntnis: Karl Barths kontextuelle Lektüre des Heidelberger Katechismus received the Lautenschläger Award for Theological Promise and the Ernst Wolf Award. Their second book, After Method: Queer Grace, Conceptual Design, and the Possibility of Theology is forthcoming with WJK this year.

Reichel co-chairs AAR’s Christian Systematic Theology unit and is a member of the steering committees of AAR’s Reformed History and Theology unit, the Karl Barth Society of North America unit, and the annual International Karl Barth Conference in Switzerland. Reichel co-edits Brill’s Studies in Systematic Theology series as well as Routledge’s Karl Barth Studies series and chairs Princeton Theological Seminary’s Center for Barth Studies advisory board.

Reichel’s teaching spans doctrine and political theology. Their research interests include Christology, theological anthropology, eschatology, doctrine of God, theological epistemology, political theology, queer theology, and theologies of the digital. Reichel is currently working on two monograph-length projects: Against Humanity embraces critical interventions against core categories of theological anthropology from queer, crip, and decolonial scholarship in a work of conceptual redesign. Political Theologies of Omniscience analyzes contemporary surveillance cultures through a doctrinal lens, developing a typology of disciplining, performing, controlling, and replicating surveillance in conversation with historical debates on divine omniscience relating to eschatology, election, providence, and creation.

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Kathleen M. O’Connor, Class of 1984

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