×

Money and Mission

The Distillery Season Six

Princeton Theological Seminary alum Mark Elsdon, MDiv ’04, lives and works at the intersection of money and meaning as an entrepreneur, consultant, pastor, and speaker engaged in faith-based impact investing, church property development, and social enterprise. Elsdon is co-founder of Rooted Good, which seeks to create more good in the world through social innovation. He is also executive director at Pres House on the University of Wisconsin's Madison campus and he is owner of Elsdon Strategic Consulting. Elsdon is president of the board of directors of Working Capital for Community.

In this episode, Shari Oosting speaks with Elsdon about his book, We Aren't Broke: Uncovering Hidden Resources in Mission and Ministry. In their conversation, Elsdon expands on why he insists the church and ministries have more assets than they realize.

Photo Mark Elsdon

Guests

Mark Elsdon lives and works at the intersection of money and meaning as an entrepreneur, pastor, consultant, and speaker. He is the author of the book, We Aren't Broke: Uncovering Hidden Resources for Mission and Ministry. Elsdon is cofounder of RootedGood, which seeks to create more good in the world through social innovation; executive director at Pres House on the University of Wisconsin's Madison campus; and owner of Elsdon Strategic Consulting. Elsdon is president of the board of directors of Working Capital for Community Needs (WCCN) an impact investing fund that provides micro-finance for the working poor in Latin America. 

Elsdon has a BA in Psychology from UC Berkeley, a Master of Divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary, and an MBA from the University of Wisconsin School of Business. Elsdon is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church, USA, and lives in Madison, Wisconsin with his spouse and two daughters. He is an avid cyclist and considers it a good year when he rides more miles on his bike than he drives in his car.

Educating faithful Christian leaders.

Author, Speaker, Ordained Minister

Danielle Shroyer, Class of 1999

“To be in a community where I got to hear so many different perspectives—that was profound for me. I’m grateful for the curiosity, for the practice of learning that was cultivated for me at Seminary.”