2023 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report - Princeton Theological Seminary

Security at Princeton Theological Seminary

Your safety and security is extremely important to us at Princeton Theological Seminary. The Seminary has very little crime, but the potential for it exists. The following information provides the steps you can take to help us ensure a safe and secure campus.

Princeton Theological Seminary is one of ten theological seminaries of the Presbyterian Church (USA). It was founded in 1812, the first seminary established by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church. Students come from 44 states, plus two territories, Guam, and Puerto Rico, plus 23 countries.

Preparation and Disclosure of Annual Security and Fire Report

Information for this report is compiled from various Seminary departments (particularly Facilities, Public Safety, Student Life and Campus Security Authority reports. as well as sources outside the Seminary, including the Princeton Police Department (main campus) and West Windsor Police Department (CRW/Witherspoon complex) and Lawrence Police Department (Farminary). The document is prepared by the Public Safety Department to which all criminal offenses should be reported. Each year the report is emailed or a hard copy delivered via campus mail to all members of the Seminary community. In addition, the report can be found here (https://inside.ptsem.edu/Community/PublicSafety/Content.aspx).

Public Safety Department

The Public Safety Department consists of the Director of Public Safety, Assistant Director of Public Safety 1 Patrol Supervisor, 11 Full-time patrol officers, 5 Part-time officers, and 10 student dispatchers and shuttle drivers. Many of the Public Safety officers have prior police and/or security experience/training. The Seminary also provides an introductory training program as well as an ongoing program of in-service and on-the-job training for patrol officers and dispatchers in the area of patrol procedures, emergency response, radio use, customer service, CPR, AED, first aid, Mental Health First Aid, crime prevention ,report writing, etc. All dispatchers go through regular training based on the Association of Public Safety Communication official’s guidelines and campus policies as well as ongoing in-service trainings.

Public Safety provides 24-hour patrol protection to the Seminary. Public Safety officers are a non-sworn private Public Safety entity responsible for the safety and security within the boundaries of Seminary campus; they are not commissioned officers under New Jersey Law. Public Safety officers do not have arrest authority, are unarmed, and no one is allowed to possess a weapon on campus. Public Safety also manages the campus access control system, video monitoring system, parking, campus shuttle system, emergency management, and fire safety.

Reporting a Crime

PTS Community members and guests should report all crimes immediately to the Public Safety Department. Emergency calls or reports of serious crimes (murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, burglary, motor vehicle or other thefts) should be made directly to the Princeton, West Windsor, or Lawrence Police/Fire Departments by dialing 911 in addition to the Public Safety department. Rape and assault victims are also encouraged to seek immediate medical attention.

The Emergency telephone number for Public Safety Dispatch is 609.497.7777, or extension 7777 if calling from a campus phone. In addition, several emergency phones provide a direct service to Public Safety Dispatch Center, not to local police. Painted bright yellow with a blue light on top, these phones are at the following locations.

  • Adams House: portico front entrance
  • Mackay Campus Center: left wall of front porch
  • Library: one in main lot (where Armstrong Place ends) and one at the opposite northwest corner
  • Stuart Hall: side of building by handicap ramp
  • CRW: one to the right of the CN center, one in the pavilion between 501 Farber Road and 201 Loetscher Place, one by the circle at the end of Farber Road, 101 Loetscher side, 201 Loetscher side, 101 building Breezeway entrances Loetscher and Emmons side, 201 Building breezeway entrance Loetscher side, 501 building breezeway entrance facing Witherspoon
  • Parking Deck: 3 per level, 9 total
  • Templeton Hall: Staff lot side
  • Hodge Hall: (Quad Side)
  • The Farminary: outside the Pump room
  • There are also emergency phones in the lounges of Brown Hall, Alexander Hall, and Hodge Hall

Upon receipt of any complaint (criminal or otherwise), an officer will respond, assess the situation, take appropriate immediate action, and document the incident in a report. All crimes are included in our daily log and those designated Clery crimes are included in our crime statistics in the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report. Follow-up investigations will be conducted in appropriate situations. Public Safety and/or other employees receiving the report of a crime will advise victims of their option to file criminal charges with local law enforcement authorities as appropriate.

The Princeton Theological Public Safety Department works very closely with the Princeton Police Department (main campus), West Windsor Police Department (CRW/Witherspoon complex), Lawrence Township Police (Farminary) and other law enforcement agencies. A formal written MOU exists between Princeton Police and PTS Public Safety as well as West Windsor Police and PTS Public Safety. A Verbal MOU exists with (a similar written MOU is in the process of being drafted) with the Lawrence Township Police department. Arrests of individuals on Seminary property are made by the local police department of jurisdiction and when needed with the assistance of the Public Safety Department.

Anyone who is the victim of a crime is encouraged to report the crime to the Princeton Police Department (main campus) by dialing 911 (#911 from a campus phone) or 609.921.2100, West Windsor Police Department (CRW/Witherspoon complex) by dialing 911 (#911 from a campus phone) or 609.799.1222 and Lawrence Township Police (Farminary) by dialing 911 or 609. 896-1111.

PTS Public Safety cannot report the crime for the victim but will coordinate and assist with the process. Often, municipal police departments, such as Princeton and West Windsor, will only take a report from the victim. If deemed necessary, municipal police may investigate and potentially work with the PTS Public Safety Team.

The Seminary acknowledges that there may be instances when a pastoral or professional counselor becomes aware of a campus crime because of a confidential disclosure by a client. In these situations, the counselor must inform the client of appropriate procedures to report the crime. The client, through the Director of Counseling or the Campus Conduct Hotline, may submit a confidential crime report: 866-943-5787 or www.intouchwebsite.com/CCH2192.

The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others. With such information, the Seminary can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics for the institution.

Although the Seminary does not have any non-campus locations of officially recognized student organizations, information is regularly received, by the Public Safety department, from municipal police departments regarding criminal activity in the public areas around campus, non-campus properties, or off-campus incidents involving members of the Princeton Theological Seminary community. A follow-up investigation or outreach to those involved may occur.

Princeton Theological Seminary will, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence, or a non-forcible sex offense, the results of any disciplinary hearing conducted by the Seminary against a student who is the alleged perpetrator of the crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of the crime or offense, Princeton Theological Seminary will provide the results of the disciplinary hearing to the victim’s next of kin, if so requested.

Security and Access to Campus Facilities

The Seminary is private property and is only open to students, faculty, staff, guests and those with business at the Seminary. Campus boundaries are defined through marked entrances and visual landscape design, however, the campus is physically open to people coming on campus. Seminary Public Safety patrols the grounds 24 hours a day in order to deter and/or detect intruders. While known trespassers are escorted off campus and/or arrested, it is virtually impossible to limit access only to individuals who have a right to be on campus. All persons entering campus are expected to abide by current Seminary policies and procedures.

Seminary offices are open from 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Seminary residence halls are always locked and accessible by card access. The academic buildings are generally unlocked 8:00 am-6:00 pm when classes are scheduled. Classes generally begin at 8:30 a.m. and end at 6:30 p.m. After 6:00 pm buildings are accessible via card access where appropriate. 

Seminary property is posted with trespass warnings and Security staff patrol them on a regular basis. Building hours may be adjusted based on academic needs as determined by the Executive Vice President or his/her designee.

Facilities personnel maintain the buildings and grounds with a concern for safety and security. When broken windows, locks, or lights are reported to a Public Safety Officer officer or discovered by officers on their daily rounds, they are reported immediately to facilities. These reports are responded to quickly, and the needed repairs or replacements are made to maintain a high level of safety and security for the campus. Periodic inspections are made of all campus lighting, trees and shrubbery, and emergency telephones, and recommendations are made for improved safety measures.

Security and Access to Campus Facilities

The Seminary is private property and is only open to students, faculty, staff, guests and those with business at the Seminary. Campus boundaries are defined through marked entrances and visual landscape design; however, the campus is physically open to people coming on campus. Seminary Public Safety patrols the grounds 24 hours a day in order to deter and/or detect intruders. While known trespassers are escorted off campus by Public Safety and/or arrested by local police, it is virtually impossible to limit access only to individuals who have a right to be on campus. All persons entering campus are expected to abide by current Seminary policies and procedures.

Seminary offices are open from 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Seminary residence halls are always locked and accessible by card access. The academic buildings are generally unlocked 8:00 am-6:00 pm when classes are scheduled. Classes generally begin at 8:30 a.m. and end at 6:30 p.m. After 6:00 pm buildings are accessible via card access where appropriate. 

Seminary property is posted with trespass warnings and Public Safety staff patrol them on a regular basis. Building hours may be adjusted based on academic needs as determined by the Executive Vice President or his designee.

Facilities personnel maintain the buildings and grounds with a concern for safety and security. When broken windows, locks, or lights are reported to a Public Safety officer or discovered by officers on their daily rounds, they are reported immediately to facilities. These reports are responded to quickly, and the needed repairs or replacements are made to maintain a high level of safety and security for the campus. Periodic inspections are made of all campus lighting, trees and shrubbery, and emergency telephones, and recommendations are made for improved safety measures.

Security Awareness and Crime Prevention

Everyone is encouraged to take responsibility for his or her personal security and that of others.

Practical measures include:

  • Keeping all residence hall doors locked at all times.  Doors found unlocked will be locked by public safety and facilities staff.
  • Avoiding leaving personal property unsecured or unattended in public areas by properly securing articles such as bicycles, strollers, laptops, etc.
  • Notifying Public Safety immediately if someone is behaving suspiciously, of any fire safety hazards, or of the need to repair emergency equipment.
  • At all times fully participating in fire and emergency evacuation drills and noting the location of all available emergency exits.
  • Abiding by regulations for the use and the closing times of the library and all other Seminary facilities.
  • Avoiding solitary use of remote facilities.
  • Using Seminary-issued ID card to access secured work and living spaces and by closing doors that may have been propped open by others.
  • Being familiar with the Princeton Theological Seminary Emergency Operations Guide available at Emergency Preparedness.

Routinely, through brochures, pamphlets, memorandums, in-house publications, presentations and orientations, members of the community receive crime prevention information. Some of these programs are:

  • Periodic dissemination of Crime Prevention and Fire Safety Literature.
  • Crime prevention and safety information distributed during Seminary Fest, New Student Orientation, and Deacon Orientation presentations, Departmental requested presentations, and other Seminary events.
  • Deacon training on crime prevention, fire safety, and responsibilities as a CSA
  • An informational pamphlet that covers fire safety and crime prevention practices as well as periodic notices about issues and trends.
  • The Public Safety director or his designee meets periodically with all Deacons and student life staff to discuss personal safety, crime prevention and reporting, fire safety and emergency response as well as their roles as CSAs.
  • The Public Safety director or his designee meets periodically with various student groups to conduct safety talks and review emergency response actions
  • The Public Safety director or his designee meets periodically with various PTS departments to conduct safety talks and review emergency response action
  • Mental Health First Aid is offered to the PTS community periodically 
  • The Friends and family CPR program is offered to the PTS community periodically
  • The PTS community is regularly reminded that there is an Emergency guide available to the community in print and on line at the Public Safety web page.
  • A Public Crime and Fire log, which lists all crimes on and in the immediate campus area reported to Public Safety, and any fire that occurs in an on-campus student housing facility. The Public Crime and Fire log is maintained at the Public Safety office, Templeton LL9 (across from the elevators) and is available for public review24 hours a day. The log is also available on the security web page.
  • Safety Escorts are available on-campus, 24 hours a day, to all members of the Seminary community. Vehicle and foot escorts are used.
  • All Seminary employees are screened for previous criminal convictions at the time of hiring and students are screened during the admissions process. 

Campus Security Authority

The law defines “a Campus Security Authority” as “an official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to: student housing, student discipline and campus judicial proceedings.” An example would be a dean of students who oversees student housing, a student center or student extracurricular activities because they have significant responsibility for student and campus activities. Similarly, a director of athletics, team coach, and faculty adviser to a student group also has significant responsibility for student and campus activities. A single teaching faculty member is unlikely to have significant responsibility for student and campus activities, except when serving as an adviser to a student group. Clerical staff, as well, is unlikely to have significant responsibility for student and campus activities.

After a careful review of the federal requirements, Students and Staff serving the following capacity at Princeton Theological Seminary have been determined to be Campus Public Safety Authority:

  • Seminary President
  • Executive Vice President
  • Dean of the Chapel and Vice President of Student Life
  • Associate Dean of Student Life
  • Assistant Director of Student Life
  • Assistant Director of Residential Life
  • Title IX Coordinators
  • Assistant Vice President of Operations
  • Vice President of Human Resources
  • Director of Public Safety
  • Assistant Director of Public Safety
  • Public Safety Supervisor
  • Public Safety Officers
  • Student Dispatchers
  • Deacons
  • Library student Circulation desk workers
  • Erdman Desk Attendants

Emergency Notifications

The Seminary has a campus emergency notification system (PTS Emergency Alert System) that allows for immediate mass notifications to students and employees through a variety of means including email, phone, emergency beacons, splash screens on PTS owned computers, and/or text message of any immediate threat to campus safety. All PTS email accounts are preloaded into the system. In order to ensure the receipt of emergency messages on your mobile device (text or voice) community members must ensure their information in the system is up to date by going to https://inside.ptsem.edu/AccountManagement/EmergencyAlert.aspx. In addition, all PTS spouses and family members can self-enroll to receive PTS Alerts by text. To sign up to receive PTS Alert messages by text, text “#PTSSpouse” to: (908) 332-8446 or visit https://service.icmobile.singlewire.com/anonymous/e8d17166-9119-11e8-8731-9d0a4d18f692/list/115ddcd6-1482-11eb-95eb-7702b7fef296 to sign up. Please be sure to include the # and note you have the ability to opt out at any time.

The Seminary community is regularly reminded of its existence through orientations, email, inside PTS web site, and during various Seminary safety and crime prevention functions. This system is regularly tested and the test results are made public to the appropriate members of the Seminary community.

All members of the PTS community are notified on an annual basis that they are required to notify the PTS Public Safety of any emergency or dangerous incident on campus that represents a significant emergency or that may involve an immediate or ongoing threat to the health and safety of students and/or staff and guests on campus. PTS Public Safety has a responsibility to respond to and summon the necessary resources to mitigate, investigate, and document the situation. In addition, PTS Public Safety must determine along with the Emergency Response and Recovery Team (ERRT) if the situation does pose a threat to the PTS community.

If a threat exists, The Seminary will immediately notify the community or those segments of the community that are at risk unless such notification, in the professional opinion of the responsible authorities, will compromise the efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. A member of the ERRT prepares emergency notification messages and any member of the Core ERRT or on-duty Public Safety officer or dispatcher may send an emergency message.

Timely Warnings

In an effort to provide timely notice to the Seminary community in the event of a serious incident which may pose an on-going threat to members of the Seminary community. An emailed Timely Warning Notice is sent to all students and employees on campus. A paper copy of the same email may be posted by those departments whose employees may not have regular access to their email.

Timely Warnings will be issued about any Clery Act crime (murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson), occurring within or immediately adjacent the campus geography that represents an ongoing threat to safety in order to provide the PTS community with the information necessary to make informed decisions about their health and safety

In the event the Seminary becomes aware of a potential serious threat, the Emergency Response and Recovery Team will then gather all pertinent information and determine whether timely warning is required. The Public Safety Director, or a designee, generally writes these Timely Warnings which are then approved by available members of the ERRT and distributed to the community by the Public Safety Director or a member of the Emergency Response and Recovery Team. A timely warning will generally include; date and time of incident, location of incident, the nature of the incident and possible actions or safety tips one can take to protect themselves

At the discretion of the Public Safety Director and/or the ERRT a Public Safety Notice may be issued for other area crime trends (that are not Clery crimes or a part of our Clery Geography) or safety issues that have been deemed necessary in order to provide the PTS community with the information necessary to implement appropriate personal crime prevention measures.

Substance Abuse Prevention Policy

In accordance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, the Seminary is committed to promoting an environment that supports the wellness and positive self- development of its members and allows everyone in the community to study and work unhampered by the problems and risks associated with the abuse of alcohol and the illegal use of drugs (e.g. loss of muscle control, headaches, increased likelihood of accidents, impaired judgment, personality disorders, addiction, and death). The Seminary expects all members of the community to demonstrate conduct and ethics consistent with preparation and formation for professional ministry.

Prohibition on Unlawful Activities

Members of the Seminary community are strictly prohibited from the manufacture, distribution, possession, sale, or use of illegal drugs on the campus or as part of any Seminary activity. All student social functions, organized and private, must be in compliance with federal and New Jersey state law, local ordinances, and Seminary policies. It is the responsibility of the host (or host organizations) to ensure compliance with those laws and rules.

New Jersey state law and local ordinances prohibit driving under the influence of alcohol and controlled dangerous substances; driving with an open container of alcohol in the car; the sale of such substances within 1,000 feet of elementary or secondary school property (including school buses); and employing a minor in a scheme to distribute controlled dangerous substances.

Drug and Alcohol Prevention Programs

Various programs and orientation activities are conducted by Seminary departments including, but not limited to, student development, housing and auxiliary services, Public Safety, and human resources which contain written, verbal, and electronic policy review; alcohol education programs; Employee Assistance Programs; and electronic interactive assessment tools. Some of these programs are specific to drug and alcohol issues and some are more general programs with a drug and alcohol component. They all combine to send a cohesive message in support of the Drug Free Schools and Community Act. Some of the programs offered are:

  • The Student Counseling page on Inside PTS has a self assessment that includes assessment for substance use
  • Substance use is screened at intake in the Office of Student Counseling
  • The Counseling Lending Library includes books and resources related to various addictions and ways to intervene.
  • Several counselors in the Student Health Benefits plan specialize in treatment of substance use
  • Printed literature and information on substance use is available in the Student Counseling Office

Substance use and intervention/treatment are included in a number of practical theology department classes on campus every year:

PC5210 Pastoral Care in Congregation and Context: This course explores pastoral care within a multi-systems perspective that includes family dynamics, congregational culture, and social context. Students will be introduced to pastoral care from a variety of multicultural contexts, and will consider how their own social location and family of origin inform their style of pastoral ministry. Family systems theory will then frame a critical examination of pastoral care issues related to individuals and congregations. Case studies will be used to explore best practices for responding to a range of issues from a multi-systems perspective, including sickness, abuse in the home, coming out to parents, grieving death, and addiction recovery.

PC5510 Addiction, Compulsion, and Grace: surveys addictive and compulsive behaviors, including alcohol and drug abuse, and the possible causality of trauma, mental illness, and social oppression.  Students practice 12-step spirituality and become familiar with dimensions of recovery.

Pastoral Care of Addiction is a certificate course offered in the continuing education department and is taught by the professor who teaches the PC5510 course above.

Students can access affordable counseling and inpatient treatment for addictive behavior patterns, especially if they are enrolled in the student health insurance plan.  Employees can access such services through the EAP program and through the employee health insurance network.  For more information, see https://inside.ptsem.edu/Publications/SeminaryHandbook/Content.aspx?id=116917254

Alcohol Policy

The Seminary considers the use of alcoholic beverages in moderate amounts to be a matter of responsible personal choice. The possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages on the campus of Princeton Theological Seminary and at Seminary-related events is regulated by the statutes of the State of New Jersey and Seminary Policy. Students are expected to maintain maturity and moderation in the private use of alcohol in the Seminary residence halls and apartments. Except as otherwise permitted pursuant to this policy, no alcohol is permitted in hallways, meeting rooms, residential building lounges, and other common/public areas within Seminary buildings or outside on Seminary property. The Seminary’s director of conferences and hospitality may provide for the service of wine in any of the Seminary’s facilities for events in the life of the community or outside groups. A request for this service must be made in advance of any event. An insured third-party bartender must pour the wine (the Seminary’s food service provider meets this requirement). Nonalcoholic beverages must be offered at any event at which wine is served. Kegs of beer are prohibited under all circumstances.

In accordance with New Jersey law, no person under 21 years of age shall possess, purchase, or consume alcoholic beverages on campus, nor shall any person at the Seminary offer, give, or sell alcoholic beverages to anyone under 21 years of age or who is intoxicated. It is also a violation of the law for a person under the legal drinking age to possess alcohol or to misrepresent his or her age, through the use of a fraudulent identification card or otherwise, in order to be served alcoholic beverages illegally.

New Jersey statutes and local ordinances explicitly forbid the sale of alcoholic beverages unless the seller holds a state liquor license. The Seminary does not hold such a license for social functions on campus. No alcoholic beverages may be sold anywhere on campus. No admission (no matter how named) may be charged or accepted for cocktail parties or other drinking parties.

When evidence exists violations have occurred, the persons involved will be subject to Seminary disciplinary sanctions as well as any sanctions that may be imposed by local law enforcement agencies.

Drug Policy

New Jersey state law classifies heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, LSD, and hashish, among other substances, as “controlled dangerous substances.” The possession, use, sale, or manufacture of such substances is subject to mandatory legal penalties in addition to Seminary disciplinary action.

Reporting and Counseling

Persons who believe they have a substance abuse problem, who are concerned about someone who may have such a problem, or who wish to report a violation of this policy may speak with any of the following administrators:

  • Dean of the Chapel and Vice President of Student Life
  • Director of Student Counseling
  • Vice President of Human Resources
  • Associate Dean of Student Life

Counseling Services

Confidential counseling services are available on campus by calling 609.497.7844 or  visit https://inside.ptsem.edu/Community/StudentCounseling/Content.aspx. All enrolled students may also receive counseling services at Trinity Counseling Services at 609.924.0060

Emergency Contact

Call 911 immediately if an individual may have overdosed on alcohol or drugs and may be at risk. A student in a psychological crisis should come directly to the student counseling office in Templeton Hall during office hours. After hours, seek help from Seminary security staff through phone numbers reserved for psychological crises: main campus 609.273.9727, and CRW 609.273.9726. A Public Safety officer will come to the person in crisis as quickly as possible, contact the director of student counseling or one of the administrators on the Psychological Crisis Response Team, and may help arrange transportation. Individuals can also go directly to the emergency room of the Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center, or call Penn Medicine Princeton House Behavioral Health, the hospital’s psychiatric branch, at 609.497.3355. Crisis hotlines are 609.896.2120 or 609.585.2244 (If there is no answer, or the contact counselor is on another call, please call again). Princeton Police can be reached at 609.921.2100. The number for West Windsor Township Police is 609.799.1222. In certain emergencies, the Seminary may try to reach the emergency contact person a student listed on his or her admission application.

Penalties

Any substance found in violation of this policy is subject to immediate confiscation. Violations of the above policies will result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. A mandatory four-session assessment with an approved counselor and/or participation in and successful completion of an approved drug or alcohol abuse rehabilitation program may be required. Prosecution for violations of the law will be made at the discretion of the responding local police department.

More information about current federal laws, state laws, and local ordinances concerning alcohol and controlled dangerous substances are available at the Public Safety office. Federal drug trafficking penalties are found at https://www.justice.gov/usao-nh/frequently-used-federal-drug-statutes.

Notice of Federal Student Financial Aid Penalties for Drug Law Violations

As prescribed in Section 484(r) of the Higher Education Act, a student who, during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving any federal grant, loan, or work assistance, is convicted of any offense under any federal or state law involving the possession or sale of a controlled substance shall not be eligible to receive any additional grant, loan, or work assistance from the date of that conviction for the period of time specified in the following table.

State and Local Penalties for Illicit Drugs

Leader of Narcotics Trafficking Network (N.J.S.A. 2C:35-3) 
A leader of narcotics trafficking network (an organizer, supervisor, manager, or financier of a scheme distributing any Schedule I or II drug) is a crime of the first degree and upon conviction thereof, except as may be provided by N.J.S. 2C:35-12, shall be sentenced to an ordinary term of life imprisonment during which the person must serve 25 years before being eligible for parole. The court may also impose a fine not to exceed $750,000 or five times the street value of the controlled dangerous substance, controlled substance analog, gamma hydroxybutyrate, or flunitrazepam involved, whichever is greater.

Maintaining or Operating a Controlled Dangerous Substance (CDS) Production Facility (N.J.S.A. 2C:35-4)
Any person who knowingly maintains or operates any premises, place, or facility used for the manufacture of methamphetamine, lysergic acid diethylamide, phencyclidine, gamma hydroxybutyrate, flunitrazepam, or marijuana in an amount greater than 5 pounds or 10 plants or any substance listed in Schedule I or II; or the analog of any such substance, or any person who knowingly aids, promotes, finances, or otherwise participates in the maintenance or operations of such premises, place, or facility, is guilty of a crime of the first degree and shall, except as provided in N.J.S. 2C:35-12, be sentenced to a term of imprisonment which shall include the imposition of a minimum term that shall be fixed at, or between, one-third and one-half of the sentence imposed, during which the defendant shall be ineligible for parole. The court may also impose a fine not to exceed $750,000 or five times the street value of all controlled dangerous substances, controlled substance analogs, gamma hydroxybutyrate, or flunitrazepam at any time manufactured or stored at such premises, place, or facility, whichever is greater.

Manufacturing, Distributing, or Dispensing (N.J.S.A. 2C:35-5)
It shall be unlawful for any person knowingly or purposely: (1) to manufacture, distribute, or dispense, or to possess or have under his or her control with intent to manufacture, distribute, or dispense, a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog; or (2) to create, distribute, or possess or have under his or her control with intent to distribute, a counterfeit controlled dangerous substance. The statute further provides minimum imprisonment terms and fines based on the type and amount of controlled substance being manufactured, distributed, or dispensed. 

Using a Juvenile in a Drug Distribution Scheme (N.J.S.A. 2C:35-6)
Any person being at least 18 years of age who knowingly uses, solicits, directs, hires, or employs a person 17 years of age or younger to violate N.J.S. 2C:35-4 or subsection a. of N.J.S. 2C:35-5, is guilty of a crime of the second degree and shall, except as provided in N.J.S. 2C:35-12, be sentenced to a term of imprisonment which shall include the imposition of a minimum term that shall be fixed at, or between, one-third and one-half of the sentence imposed, or five years, whichever is greater, during which the defendant shall be ineligible for parole. The court may also impose a fine not to exceed $500,000 or five times the street value of the controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog involved, whichever is greater.

Distribution on or within 1,000 Feet of School Property (N.J.S.A. 2C:35-7)
Any person who violates subsection a. of N.J.S. 2C:35-5 by distributing, dispensing, or possessing with intent to distribute a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog while on any school property used for school purposes that is owned by or leased to any elementary or secondary school or school board, or within 1,000 feet of such school property or a school bus, or while on any school bus, is guilty of a crime of the third degree and shall, except as provided in N.J.S. 2C:35-12, be sentenced by the court to a term of imprisonment. Where the violation involves less than one ounce of marijuana, the term of imprisonment shall include the imposition of a minimum term which shall be fixed at, or between, one-third and one-half of the sentence imposed, or one year, whichever is greater, during which the defendant shall be ineligible for parole. In all other cases, the term of imprisonment shall include the imposition of a minimum term which shall be fixed at, or between, one-third and one-half of the sentence imposed, or three years, whichever is greater, during which the defendant shall be ineligible for parole. A fine of up to $150,000 may also be imposed upon any conviction for a violation of this section.

Distribution to Persons Under 18 or Pregnant Females (N.J.S.A. 2C:35-8)
Any person being at least 18 years of age who has been convicted for violating subsection a. of N.J.S. 2C:35-5 or section 1 of P.L. 1987, c. 101 (C. 2C:35-7) by distributing a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog to a pregnant female or a person 17 years of age or younger shall, except as provided in N.J.S. 2C:35-12, be subject to twice the term of imprisonment, fine, and penalty, including twice the term of parole ineligibility, if any, authorized or required to be imposed by subsection b. of N.J.S. 2C:35-5 or section 1 of P.L. 1987, c. 101 (C. 2C:35-7) or any other provision of this title.

Strict Liability for Drug-Induced Death (N.J.S.A. 2C:35-9)
Any person who manufactures, distributes, or dispenses methamphetamine, lysergic acid diethylamide, phencyclidine, or any other controlled dangerous substance classified in Schedules I or II, or any controlled substance analog thereof, in violation of subsection a. of N.J.S. 2C:35-5, is strictly liable for a death that results from the injection, inhalation, or ingestion of that substance, and is guilty of a crime of the first degree.

Possession, Use, Being Under the Influence, or Failure to Make Lawful Disposition (N.J.S.A. 2C:35-10)
It is unlawful for any person, knowingly or purposely, to obtain, or to possess, actually or constructively, a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog, unless the substance was obtained directly, or pursuant to a valid prescription or order form from a practitioner, while acting in the course of his or her professional practice, or except as otherwise authorized by .L.1970, c.226 (C.24:21-1 et seq.). Any person who violates this section with respect to: (1) a controlled dangerous substance, or its analog, classified in Schedule I, II, III, or IV other than those specifically covered in this section, is guilty of a crime of the third degree except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S. 2C:43-3, a fine of up to $35,000 may be imposed; (2) any controlled dangerous substance, or its analog, classified in Schedule V, is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S. 2C:43-3, a fine of up to $15,000 may be imposed; (3) possession of more than 50 grams of marijuana, including any adulterants or dilatants, or more than 5 grams of hashish, is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree, except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S. 2C:43-3, a fine of up to $25,000 may be imposed; or (4) possession of 50 grams or less of marijuana, including any adulterants or dilatants, or 5 grams or less of hashish is a disorderly person. Any person who commits any offense defined in this section while on any property used for school purposes that is owned by or leased to any elementary or secondary school or school board, or within 1,000 feet of any such school property or a school bus, or while on any school bus, and who is not sentenced to a term of imprisonment, shall, in addition to any other sentence that the court may impose, be required to perform not less than 100 hours of community service.

Imitation Controlled Dangerous Substance (CDS) (N.J.S.A. 2C:35-11)
a. It is unlawful for any person to distribute or to possess or have under his or her control with intent to distribute any substance that is not a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog: (1) upon the express or implied representation to the recipient that the substance is a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog; or (2) upon the express or implied representation to the recipient that the substance is of such nature, appearance, or effect that the recipient will be able to distribute or use the substance as a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog; or (3) under circumstances that would lead a reasonable person to believe that the substance is a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog. Any of the following shall constitute prima facie evidence of such circumstances: (a) the substance was packaged in a manner normally used for the unlawful distribution of controlled dangerous substances or controlled substance analogs; (b) the distribution or attempted distribution of the substance was accompanied by an exchange of or demand for money or other thing as consideration for the substance, and the value of the consideration exceeded the reasonable value of the substance; or (c) the physical appearance of the substance is substantially the same as that of a specific controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog. b. It is unlawful for any person to manufacture, compound, encapsulate, package, or imprint any substance that is not a controlled dangerous substance, controlled substance analog, or any combination of such substances, other than a prescription drug, with the purpose that it resembles or duplicate the physical appearance of the finished form, package, label, or imprint of a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog. c. In any prosecution under this section, it shall not be a defense that the defendant mistakenly believed a substance to be a controlled dangerous substance or controlled substance analog. d. A violation of this section is a crime of the third degree, except that, notwithstanding the provisions of subsection b. of N.J.S. 2C:43-3, a fine of up to $200,000 may be imposed. 

Use or Possession with Intent to Use Narcotic Paraphernalia (N.J.S.A. 2C:36-2)
It shall be unlawful for any person to use, or to possess with intent to use, drug paraphernalia to plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process, prepare, test, analyze, pack, repack, store, contain, conceal, ingest, inhale, or otherwise introduce into the human body a controlled dangerous substance, controlled substance analog or toxic chemical in violation of the provisions of chapter 35 of this title. Any person who violates this section is guilty of a disorderly person’s offense. 

Distribute, Dispense, Possess with Intent to, Narcotics Paraphernalia (N.J.S.A. 2C:36-3)
It shall be unlawful for any person to distribute or dispense, or possess with intent to distribute or dispense, or manufacture with intent to distribute or dispense, drug paraphernalia, knowing that it will be used to plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process, prepare, test, analyze, pack, repack, store, contain, conceal, ingest, inhale, or otherwise introduce into the human body a controlled dangerous substance, controlled substance analog, or toxic chemical in violation of the provisions of Chapter 35 of this title. Any person who violates this section commits a crime of the fourth degree.

Advertise to Promote Sale of Narcotics Paraphernalia (N.J.S.A. 2C:36-4)
It shall be unlawful for any person to place in any newspaper, magazine, handbill, or other publication any advertisement, knowing that the purpose of the advertisement, in whole or in part, is to promote the sale of objects intended for use as drug paraphernalia. Any person who violates this section commits a crime of the fourth degree.

Delivering Paraphernalia to Persons Under 18 Years (N.J.S.A. 2C:36-5)
Any person 18 years of age or over who violates N.J.S. 2C:36-3 by delivering drug paraphernalia to a person under 18 years of age commits a crime of the third degree.

Possession or Distribution of Hypodermic Syringe (N.J.S.A. 2C:36-6)
It shall be unlawful for a person to have under his control or possess with intent to use a hypodermic syringe, hypodermic needle, or any other instrument adapted for the use of a controlled dangerous substance or a controlled substance analog as defined in Chapter 35 of Title 2C of the New Jersey Statutes or to sell, furnish, or give to any person such syringe, needle, or instrument. Any person who violates this section is guilty of a disorderly person’s offense.

Health Risks

The use of illicit drugs is associated with many health risks, including hepatitis, HIV, addiction, and impaired ability to function. Alcohol abuse is associated with impaired coordination, decreased mental alertness, and many other health risks. Health risks of illicit drug use and alcohol abuse increase with prolonged use. The following briefly summarizes the health risks and symptoms associated with alcohol abuse and use of illicit drugs. It is important to note that individuals experience alcohol and drugs in different ways based on physical tolerance, body size, gender, and a variety of other physical and psychological factors.

Alcohol
Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even low doses significantly impair judgment and the coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident. Low to moderate doses of alcohol also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairment in higher mental functions, severely altering a person’s ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects described. Repeated use of alcohol can lead to addiction. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver. Drinking during pregnancy may cause birth defects such as fetal alcohol syndrome, mental retardation and irreversible physical abnormalities. Research also indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk of becoming alcoholics.

Marijuana
Marijuana use leads to a substantial increase in the heart rate. It impairs or reduces short-term memory and comprehension. Motivation and cognition can be altered. With extended use, it can produce paranoia and psychosis. Smoking marijuana damages the lungs and pulmonary system. Marijuana contains more cancer-causing agents than tobacco. It also lowers male sex hormones, suppresses ovulation, and causes changes in the menstrual cycle and possible birth defects. Someone who uses marijuana may laugh inappropriately and have bloodshot eyes, dry mouth and throat, odor of the drug, and a poor sense of timing and increased appetite.

Cocaine and Crack
Health risks may include changes in body temperature and blood pressure as well as heart and breathing rates. Even small amounts may cause the body to exceed its own limits, sometimes resulting in death. Snorting cocaine may severely damage nasal tissue and the septum. Smoking cocaine may damage the lungs. Someone using cocaine may experience muscle twitching, panic reactions, anxiety, numbness in hands and feet, loss of weight, a period of hyperactivity followed by a crash, a runny or bleeding nose, and depression. Other symptoms of cocaine may include nausea, vomiting, insomnia, tremors and, convulsions. Chronic users may become paranoid and/or experience hallucinations. 

Barbiturates
In small doses, barbiturates produce calmness, relaxed muscles, and lowered anxiety. Larger doses cause slurred speech, staggering gait, and altered perception. Very large doses, or doses taken in combination with other central nervous system depressants (e.g., alcohol), may cause respiratory depression, coma, and even death. A person who uses barbiturates may have poor muscle control, appear drowsy or drunk, become confused, irritable, or inattentive, or have slowed reactions. 

Amphetamines
Amphetamines, methamphetamines, or other stimulants can cause increased heart and respiratory rates, elevated blood pressure, and dilated pupils. Larger doses cause rapid or irregular heartbeat, tremors, and physical collapse. An amphetamine injection creates a sudden increase in blood pressure that can result in stroke, high fever, heart failure, and death. An individual using amphetamines might begin to lose weight; have the sweats; and appear restless, anxious, moody, and unable to focus. Extended use may produce psychosis, including hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia.

Hallucinogens (Including PCP, LSD, Mescaline, Peyote, Psilocybin)
PCP, or angel dust, interrupts the part of the brain that controls the intellect and keeps instincts in check. PCP blocks pain receptors. Violent episodes, including self-inflicted injuries, are not uncommon in PCP users. Chronic users report memory loss and speech difficulty. Very large doses produce convulsions, coma, heart and lung failure, or ruptured blood vessels in the brain. LSD, mescaline, peyote, etc. cause dilated pupils, elevated body temperature, increased heart rate and blood pressure, and tremors. Someone under the influence of PCP might appear moody, aggressive, or violent. Such an individual may become paranoid and experience hallucinations and have time and body movements slowed. People using LSD may experience loss of appetite, sleeplessness, confusion, anxiety, and panic and may report perceptual distortion. Flashbacks may occur.

Narcotics (Including Heroin, Codeine, Morphine, Opium, Percodan)
Because narcotics are generally injected, the use of contaminated needles may result in many different diseases, including AIDS and hepatitis. Symptoms of overdose include shallow breathing, clammy skin, convulsions, and coma and may result in death. Some signs of narcotic use is euphoria, drowsiness, constricted pupils, and nausea. Other symptoms include itchy skin; needle or “track” marks on the arms and legs; nodding; lack of sex drive and appetite; and sweating, cramps, and nausea when withdrawing from the drug.

Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking

The Princeton Theological Seminary has adopted a single Nondiscrimination and Anti-Harassments (Title IX and Title VI) Policy and procedure. Below is a summary of portions of that document that pertain to Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking. The entire policy appears at the end of this report as Appendix A and on our web page at https://inside.ptsem.edu/Community/NondiscriminationAnti-Harassment/Content.aspx  which contains a more detailed explanation of the below topics.

Princeton Theological Seminary  prohibits dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking, in any manner under the Clery act as well as any State and Local law. This policy applies to all Seminary employees, students, family members, visitors, vendors, and any other individuals who participate in the Seminary’s programs or activities or who are otherwise on campus. It applies at all times, and in all places, to those with any connection to the Seminary. At all times, the Seminary, in its sole discretion, may amend or revise this policy, and the practices and procedures included herein, as it deems appropriate.

Definitions

Sexual Assault without Consent – The following definitions also apply to instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of the victim’s age or because of the victim’s temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. These include: 1) rape (except statutory rape), defined as the carnal knowledge of a person, without the consent of the victim; 2) sodomy, defined as oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person, without the consent of the victim; 3) sexual assault with an object, defined as to use an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slightly, the genital or anal opening of the body of another person, without the consent of the victim; and 4) fondling, defined as the touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim.

Sexual Assault (Clery Act Definition) – Any sexual act directed against another person, without consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent. Sexual assault includes: (1) rape, defined as penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus, with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim. This offense includes the rape of a person of any gender. Attempts or assaults to commit rape, per this definition, are also included; (2) fondling, defined as touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim; (3) incest, defined as sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law; and (4) statutory rape, defined as sexual intercourse with a person who is under the age of consent (18 years old).

Dating Violence – Violence, because of sex, committed by a person (1) who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and (2) where the existence of such a relationship will be determined based on a consideration of the following factors: the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

Domestic Violence – Felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed, because of sex, by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated as a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the state of New Jersey.

Stalking – Engaging in a course of conduct, because of sex, directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to experience either: (1) fear for one’s safety or the safety of others; or (2) suffer substantial emotional distress.

Consent – Consent is clear, knowing, and voluntary. Consent is active, not passive; silence, in and of itself, cannot be interpreted as consent. Consent to any one form of sexual activity, a previous relationship, and/or prior consent does not imply consent to any other form or instance of sexual activity.

Reporting

PTS encourages reporting of all perceived incidents of discrimination or harassment. It is the policy of PTS to promptly and thoroughly investigate such reports. PTS prohibits retaliation against any individual who, in good faith, reports discrimination or harassment or participates in an investigation of such reports.

There are three main steps in the process of attending to a claim of harassment or discrimination. These include: Step 1 – Reporting a Complaint, Step 2 – Addressing the Complaint, and Step 3 – Resolution through an Informal or Formal Resolution Process. Appendix A provides a flowchart to help visualize the procedures for addressing potential discrimination and/or harassment at PTS.

Reporting Outlets – Claims of harassment, discrimination and/or other violations of this policy against members of the Seminary community should be promptly made to one or more of the following that apply, and when necessary, immediately made. Prompt action will be taken upon this official report.

Title VI/Title IX Co-Coordinators[1] ([email protected]  )

  • Tom Chester, PTS Vice President for Human Resources, Administration Building Room 13, 609-497-7721
  • Yedea Walker, PTS Associate Dean of Student Life, 204 Templeton Hall, 609-430-2771

Confidential Resources  These individuals keep discussions confidential and are not required to report incidents to the Co-Coordinators. Conversations with these individuals are not considered a complaint.

  • Director of Student Counseling – Rev. Wanda Sevey at [email protected], 301 Templeton Hall

Except as otherwise required by law, individuals who serve as “confidential resources” may not report to the Seminary any identifying information about behavior that may implicate the Seminary’s policies against harassment and discrimination without the consent of the individual who supplied the information in question. Sharing with law enforcement or Child Protective Services, however, is required to address an imminent risk of harm to the safety of the community at large, the individual sharing the information, or another member of the community; or, when the information involves potential child abuse, elder abuse, or the abuse of a disabled person.

Any member of the Seminary community may report an incident or allegation of discrimination, sex discrimination, or sexual harassment (whether or not the person reporting is the person alleged to be the victim of conduct that could constitute discrimination, sex discrimination or sexual harassment), through a variety of methods. Individuals may report a claim using the Reporting Form   or by email, phone, or in person, and submit the report form, written report, or verbal report through the following:

  • Electronically using the Reporting Form  
  • By mail or in person – Title VI/Title IX Office, Princeton Theological Seminary, PO Box 64, Princeton, NJ 08542; 204 Templeton Hall or Administration Building Room 2
  • By telephone – Mr. Chester at 609-497-7721 or Rev. Walker at 609-430-2771
  • By e-mail – [email protected]  

If you are the victim of sexual assault or violence, or for immediate response to any serious, life-threatening incident or for medical attention needs, call 911 and Public Safety:

  • PTS Public Safety, LL3 Templeton Hall (across from elevator), Emergency 609 497 7777 or activate any blue light emergency phone

These incidences may also be reported to area police departments.

Any Complainant has the right to report and the right to decline to report the matter to local law enforcement if the conduct is potentially criminal in nature. The Seminary’s obligation to respond to a complaint will not change depending upon whether or not the matter has been reported to law enforcement, but it may briefly delay the timing of an investigation if a law enforcement agency requests that the Seminary delay its process for a reasonable amount of time to allow it to gather evidence of criminal conduct. The Seminary will provide the Complainant with assistance in filing a report, if needed. Neither law enforcement’s determination whether or not to prosecute a Respondent, nor the outcome of any criminal prosecution, are determinative of whether a violation of this policy has occurred. Proceedings under this policy may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off campus.

Confidentiality

All activities under these procedures will be conducted with due regard for any legitimate privacy and reputational interests of those involved.

While the Seminary will take all reasonable steps to protect anonymity and confidentiality, it cannot, and does not, guarantee that all claims and details of such claims will be kept completely confidential. Accordingly, while the information shared will be treated as confidentially as possible, the Co-Coordinator(s) at times may need to consult with other administrators and will, at times, need to take action in the interest of safety.

Interim supportive measures

Interim supportive measures available in all cases may include: counseling, extensions of deadlines or other course-related adjustments, modifications of work or class schedules, campus escort services, mutual no-contact directives, changes in work or housing locations, leaves of absence, increased security, or monitoring of certain areas of the campus. Any interim supportive measures put in place will be kept confidential, except to the extent that doing so impairs the Seminary’s ability to provide the supportive measures.

Sanctions/Disciplinary actions

Students

Required Counseling or Educational Activity, No Contact Directive, Loss of Privileges , Disciplinary Probation, Suspension, Dismissal, Restitution, Dismissal from Seminary Housing, Housing Relocation or Housing Separation, Revocation of Admission, Withholding and/or Revocation of Degree, Withholding Diploma/Transcript.

Employee

Performance Improvement/Management Process, Required Counseling/Training, Verbal Reprimand, Written Letter of Reprimand, No Contact Directive, Financial Sanction, Loss of Oversight or Supervisory Responsibility, Unpaid Leave of Absence, Suspension with or without Pay, Termination in accordance with the Employee Handbook and/or Faculty Manual 

Sanctions for Visitors, Field Education Site Supervisors, Other Third-Parties

Not Welcome on Campus Letter, Termination of Contracts, Removal from List of Approved Field Education Sites

Standard of Evidence

The Seminary’ has adopted a preponderance of the evidence standard, meaning “more likely than not,” based upon all of the evidence,

Registered Sex Offenders Information

Information concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained from the New Jersey State Police web site at http://www.njsp.org/sex-offender-registry/index.shtml  .

Other Disciplinary Sanctions

Academic Sanctions

The academic sanctions in use by the Seminary are as follows:

Academic Alert

If a student’s academic performance requires academic oversight as discussed for each degree above, that student will be placed on academic alert. Academic alert is a formal warning and an opportunity for academic counseling, but does not become part of an individual’s permanent record. A student’s placement on academic alert may, however, be taken into account in judging the seriousness of any future academic deficiency.

Academic Probation

If a student’s academic performance in the Seminary is adjudged by the appropriate committee for his or her degree to require academic oversight as discussed for each degree above, but that committee believes suspension or dismissal to be unwarranted, the committee may place the student on academic probation for such duration as it deems appropriate. Academic probation serves both as a warning to the student and as an occasion for the committee, through the associate dean for academic administration for master’s-level students, or the appropriate program director for doctoral students, to provide special guidance concerning the student’s studies and performance.

(1)   Academic probation may be imposed or removed only by the appropriate committee, of which written notice must be given to the student by the program director. No formal hearing shall be required prior to placing a student on academic probation.

(2)   A student on academic probation must plan his or her program in consultation with the appropriate program director for his or her degree, who may, in his or her discretion after consultation with the student, prescribe the components of that program either in whole or in part.

(3)   If at any point during a period of academic probation the appropriate committee for the degree determines an absence of satisfactory academic improvement on the part of the student, said committee may proceed directly to the student’s suspension or dismissal.

Suspension

Suspension is a temporary interruption of a student’s enrollment in the Seminary. It may be for a fixed or an indefinite period. If suspension is imposed for a fixed period, the student shall have an automatic right to resume study at the expiration of the suspension. If suspension is imposed for an indefinite period, the student must petition the appropriate committee for the degree to resume study and present evidence acceptable to the committee that the reasons for the suspension have been effectively treated. If the student under indefinite suspension fails to present, within a reasonable period, evidence of making a serious effort to deal with the bases for the suspension, the committee that imposed the sanction may proceed to his or her dismissal.

Dismissal

Dismissal is the termination of a student’s enrollment at the Seminary. Where dismissal is ordered, the student’s return to the Seminary may be effected only by filing a new application for admission. In the event of such reapplication, the Seminary has the right to consider the student’s previous tenure at the Seminary in making its application decision, including without limitation, the basis of the student’s previous dismissal.

Failure to Comply with Sanctions

Should a student fail to comply with the conditions of his or her academic sanction, a written notification of noncompliance will be issued by the dean of academic affairs. Upon such notification, should the student fail to correct the noncompliance, the dean may proceed to the suspension or dismissal of the student on the grounds of noncooperation, without implying a judgment on the matter or matters for which the original disciplinary sanctions were applied.

Non-academic Sanctions

For violations of Seminary-wide rules of conduct students may be subject to several kinds of penalties:

Warning

A formal admonition that does not become part of an individual’s permanent record, but that may be taken into account in judging the seriousness of any future violation of the Seminary’s rules of conduct.

Disciplinary Probation

A more serious admonition assigned for a definite period. Probation implies that any future violation of the Seminary’s rules of conduct, of whatever kind, during that period of probation may be grounds for suspension or dismissal.

Suspension for a Definite Period

Involuntary removal from the Seminary for a specified period of time.

Indefinite Suspension

Involuntary removal from the Seminary until certain stipulated conditions have been fulfilled. These conditions may include, but are not limited to restitution for damages or issuance of a formal apology.

Dismissal

Dismissal is the termination of the student’s enrollment at the Seminary. Where dismissal is ordered, the student’s return to the Seminary may be effected only by filing a new application for admission. In the event of such reapplication, the Seminary has the right to consider the student’s previous tenure at the Seminary in making its application decision, including without limitation, the basis of the student’s previous dismissal.

Failure to Comply with Sanctions

Should a student fail to comply with the conditions of his or her disciplinary sanction, a written notification of noncompliance will be issued by the dean of student life. Upon such notification, should the student fail to correct the noncompliance, the dean may proceed to the suspension or dismissal of the student on the grounds of noncooperation, without implying a judgment on the matter or matters for which the original disciplinary sanctions were applied.

Additional information is available In the seminary hand book at https://inside.ptsem.edu/Publications/SeminaryHandbook/Content.aspx

Emergency Drills, Testing and Evacuation Procedures

Princeton Theological Seminary’s Handbook and Emergency Operations Manuals include information about the Emergency Response and Recovery Team (ERRT) and Seminary operating status parameters, incident priorities and performance expectations, evacuation guidelines, and contingency planning. Seminary departments are responsible for developing contingency plans and continuity of operations plans for their staff and areas of responsibility. An emergency response guide is available to all Seminary community members at https://inside.ptsem.edu/Community/PublicSafety/Content.aspx?id=15237933

The Seminary conducts both announced and unannounced emergency response exercises each year such as tabletop exercises, task specific drills, and internal and external tests of the emergency notification system on campus. These tests are designed to assess and evaluate the emergency plans and capabilities of the institution. An after actions report is created after any test or actual incident in order to allow the EERT to evaluate and improve response procedures.

Public Safety department members have been trained in incident command and responding to critical incidents on campus and working with local responders and federal agencies. Members of the Emergency Response and Recovery Team have also received basic instruction on responding to critical incidents on-campus and working with local responders and federal agencies.

Fire and evacuation drills are conducted in each residence hall on campus twice during the fall and spring semester and once a year in all academic and administrative buildings. PTS community members learn the location of the emergency exits in the buildings and are provided guidance about the direction they should travel when exiting each facility for a short-term building evacuation. The purpose of the evacuation is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of a fire or other emergency. All building occupants are expected to participate in any fire and evacuation drills held. This process also provides the Seminary an opportunity to test the operation of the fire alarm system and components. Evacuation drills are monitored by the Public Safety and Housing and Auxiliary Services to evaluate egress and behavioral patterns. Any equipment that is found to be deficient is reported for immediate repair.

Missing Student

Princeton Theological Seminary has a policy and procedure regarding notification that a student has been missing for more than 24 hours. As part of such policy, individuals on campus are instructed to report the possibility of a missing student to PTS’s Psychological Crisis Team, which includes the Vice President of Student Life and Dean of the Chapel, all directors in Student Life (counseling, chapel, residential life, and global services), and to PTS Public Safety.” If the initial report was not made to the director of Public Safety, the member of the Crisis Team receiving the report will immediately notify campus Public Safety.

After consultation, the Public Safety director will notify local law enforcement with jurisdiction over the area of campus from which the student has gone missing (Princeton Police for the main campus, West Windsor Police for the CRW campus, and Lawrenceville for the Farm).

The Dean of the Chapel and Vice President of Student Life, or another designated member of the Crisis Team will make the necessary notification to the student’s designated confidential missing student emergency contact person (see below) within 24 hours of receiving the report. Additionally, students are advised that they may designate a confidential contact person to be notified if they are determined to be missing.

Should a student be under 18 years of age and not emancipated The Seminary is required to notify a parent or guardian within 24 hours of the determination of being declared missing in addition to the contacting the designated confidential contact

Registering information

At the beginning of each academic year, students are advised that they may designate a confidential contact person to be notified if they are determined to be missing. Students will receive an email via their PTSEM email account directing them to the link on the PTS Public Safety web page. This voluntary election may be accessed and updated at any time at: https://inside.ptsem.edu/AccountManagement/EmergencyContact.aspx This contact will be registered confidentially and is accessible only by authorized campus officials and law enforcement for the sole use of a missing person investigation.

Regardless of whether a student elects to designate a contact person, local law enforcement will be notified within 24 hours of a student being determined to be missing. PTS’s Psychological Crisis team has procedures to follow in the event of a psychological crisis or missing student, which includes a script to follow in the acquisition of information about the person in question, and will follow such procedures upon the determination that the student has been missing for at least 24 hours. Procedures may be followed within less than 24 hours, should circumstances warrant quicker implementation. The missing student policy can also be found in the Seminary Handbook Appendix E: Missing Student Notification Policy.