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Continuing Education

Programs

Independent Study for Ministry Professionals

Come to the seminary campus to rest, reflect, and study. Need to plan your study leave? This program of self-directed learning is perfect for pastors, Christian institutional leaders, lay professionals, and scholars. Stay in the Erdman Center, steps away from the seminary Library, where you may study and explore its vast resources. Take part in the life of the seminary community by attending daily chapel, taking meals in the dining hall, meeting friends and faculty for coffee in the Brick Cafe, and attending public lectures that may be available. Hosted by the Office of Continuing Education, Independent Study weeks are offered multiple times throughout the year.

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Regional Auditing Program

Area pastors, church leaders, and community members 18 years and older are welcome to audit select seminary courses on a non-credit basis. Registration, through The Office of Continuing Education, is required and there is a fee of $175 per course with a limit of one course per person per semester.

Auditors will sit in on course lectures but should not expect to participate in class discussion, attend precepts, or have work evaluated by professors. All communication about courses should be directed to the Office of Continuing Education. No credit or certification is given for audited courses. However, pastors and church professionals may request verification of continuing education units (CEUs), at the conclusion of the semester, from the Office of Continuing Education.

* Due to construction on our main classroom building, the Regional Auditing Program will not be offered in the fall semester of 2019. Information regarding the Regional Auditing Program for the spring semester of 2020, which begins in January, will be posted in November 2019.

Educating faithful Christian leaders.

Associate Rector at Trinity Church, Princeton, New Jersey

Nancy Hagner, Class of 2013

“Preaching is one of the most important things we do as pastors because it’s one of the last places in our society where people will actually listen, perhaps to things they may not agree with.”