Donate

How to Make a Donation to Special Collections


If you are interested in making a donation of materials to Special Collections, please first contact us by telephone, email, or U.S. mail the Special Collections staff member below whose expertise most closely matches your potential gift. Providing a description or listing of the material under consideration is very helpful for Special Collections staff. Information on the quantity and type of material is also useful. For published materials, providing the author, title, date, edition, and place of publication is very helpful. Materials may be donated by outright gift or by bequest.

Special Collections staff will work with you and our acquisitions department to determine whether your proposed gift is a good match for the scope of our collections. This process may involve an examination of the materials offered in which staff evaluate the rarity, age, condition, provenance, language, and format of the materials.

Physical Transfer of Materials and Transfer of Ownership: If a decision is made to accept your materials, Special Collections will arrange to pick up local donations and requests that out of state donations be sent via U.S. Mail (return receipt) or UPS.

For U.S. Mail:  

Henry Luce III Library–Special Collections
Princeton Theological Seminary
P.O. Box 111
Princeton, N.J. 08542-0111

For UPS:  

Henry Luce III Library–Special Collections
Princeton Theological Seminary
25 Library Place
Princeton, N.J. 08542-0111

After the donation is received and accessioned, a gift agreement outlining the terms and conditions of the donation will be sent to you for your approval and signature. The signed Deed of Gift is the instrument by which legal ownership and copyright is transferred from you to Special Collections. Materials normally will not be accepted on loan. For more on gift agreements in general, see the Society of American Archivists' brochure "A Guide to Deeds of Gift."

Monetary Appraisals for Tax Purposes. Donors may be entitled to claim a tax deduction for giving books and manuscripts materials as a charitable donation. While Special Collections cannot act as tax advisors, our understanding is that to claim a donation in excess of $500 within a calendar year a donor must complete and file IRS Form 8283. For gifts valued in excess of $5,000, a formal appraisal, performed no more than 60 days before the date of the gift, is required by the IRS. Professional standards and IRS regulations prohibit Special Collections staff from making a monetary appraisal of gifts. See the organizations below for qualified appraisers who perform such work for a fee.

The donor is responsible for arranging for and paying for the cost of such an appraisal which may be tax deductible. Consult your tax advisor or attorney for further information on tax deductions.