Hispanic Theological Initiative.

Creating and Nurturing a Community of Latina and Latino Scholars.
Through the Combined Efforts of the Consortium Member Schools.
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    Theresa Lynn Torres

    Theresa Lynn Torres

    University of Missouri

    Associate Professor of Sociology and Latina Latino Studies
    Kansas City, MO
    torresth@umkc.edu
    Curriculum Vitae:

    Education

    PH.D., Catholic University of America.
    M.A., Boston College.
    B.A., Benedictine College.

    Biography Statement

    Dr. Theresa Torres is Associate Professor in the Latina/Latino Studies Program and Department of Sociology at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Her areas of expertise are Latina Latino Studies, immigration, race and ethnic relations, religious studies, and gender studies. Her current book, The Paradox of Latina Religious Leadership in the Catholic Church is an in-depth description of the on-going dynamics of religious identity and gender among Kansas City Latinas in the religious organization of the Guadalupanas and published Dec. 2013 with Palgrave MacMillan. Her most recent publication is an article, “A Latina Testimonio: Challenges as an Academic, Issues of Difference, and a Call for Solidarity with White Female Academics.” In Why We Can’t Be Friends: Women of Color and White Women in the Academy, ed. Karen Dace. New York: Routledge Press, 2012. She has been a professor at the University of Missouri for eight years and has taught a variety of courses since she is an interdisciplinarian, which means she has diverse research and scholarship from a number of fields: Race and Ethnicity, Latina Latino Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, and Religious Studies. Currently she is teaching two classes on Race and Ethnic Relations. She also engages students in community service learning projects and internships. She place students in projects that serve the inner city by having them working with non-profit agencies or participate in research projects studying the community. She serves on several boards for non-profit groups and previously worked with non-profit agencies that serve the Hispanic community of Kansas City. As a scholar, she has direct contact on a regular basis with the urban populations of Hispanics in the Midwest.