×
PTS Logo
PTS Logo

Info & Resources

Incoming MDiv, Dual (MDiv/MACEF) students and, perhaps even some MA(TS) students, are encouraged to consider joining us this summer for summer language. Although Greek and Hebrew are not required for the MDiv degree, many denominations require Greek and/or Hebrew for ordination and our Faculty encourage MDiv students to study the Bible using a language. If you are in the PCUSA, you should seriously consider taking Greek or Hebrew this coming summer. Please talk with your CPM liaison about the language and exegesis requirements. Online registration opens in April for entering students. (An email with further details will go out in the early spring.)

Additional information about Summer Session 2017 is available on the Registrar's page.  

Should I or should I not consider taking Summer Language?
Summer languages and all language study at the Seminary count as elective credits. Most entering students who choose to take a summer language prior to the Fall Semester, enroll in Greek, but you may certainly take Hebrew first, if you so choose. In the Fall Semester, you will follow your summer language study with a Fall Semester exegesis course using your new language. The fall Hebrew and Greek exegesis courses are offered for entering students who have not yet completed the required introductory Old Testament course, OT2101, or the introductory New Testament course, NT2101. The summer language course is 6 credits, a full year of study in the span of 8 weeks. It is intense. You should not plan on working alongside a summer language course. If you are not good at languages, you may wish to consider taking your language during the fall and spring semesters. If you are good at languages, taking it in an intense study manner, may work well for you.

Educating faithful Christian leaders.

PhD Student

Isaac Kim, Class of 2015

“One of the biggest lessons I learned was how to be charitable to views other than my own. Christian charity was shown to me, not just in the readings for class, but from the professors, and the Seminary community.”