Hispanic leaders convened at PTS in May for Congreguémonos, an annual conference sponsored by the School of Christian Vocation and Mission. The theme, “Ministering to the Hispanic Church in a Changing Context,” featured a lecture by PTS alumnus the Reverend Doctor Samuel Pagán (Th.M., 1997) and a worship service by piano virtuoso Adlan Cruz. Gabriel Salguero, director of the Hispanic Leadership Program at PTS, called Congreguémonos “Princeton Seminary’s broadest gathering of Hispanic laity and clergy. Every year we come together to learn, fellowship, and celebrate the Latina/o church’s contribution to U.S. Christianity.” 

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Dr. Samuel Pagán, far right, with conference participants.
Photo: Kim Schmidt

Pagán’s lecture explored his reading of Don Quixote and the Psalms with an eye toward the novel’s 21st-century applications. “People in the church need to have a sense of vision and dreams, purpose and direction,” he said, just as Don Quixote experienced. “Once you discover your vision and mission, you’re on the right track—you can dream the impossible dream with God.”

In addition to being an author, professor, and former president of the Evangelical Seminary in Puerto Rico, Pagán is an ordained minister (Disciples of Christ) and currently serves as a professor of Old Testament studies at Dar al-Kalima College in Bethlehem, Palestine. His wife, Dr. Nohemí Pagán, is also a professor at the college. They moved to Bethlehem in 2009 because they felt called to contribute to the peace process in the Middle East.

The gathering also featured a plenary addressing the Latina/o context at PTS from the perspective of three PTS leaders: Victor Aloyo (director of multicultural relations), Joanne Rodríguez (director of the Hispanic Theological Initiative), and Salguero. Another panel highlighted the experience of four local pastors—Carlos Rivera, Luis Espinosa, Karen Hernandez-Granzen, and Salguero—whose churches, according to Aloyo, are “examples of congregations trying to be relevant to the circumstances of today’s Latina/o community.”